Tuesday, 03 December 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
14:00 to 15:30 Maithreyi Narasimha Building cells

 

Morphogenesis refers to processes by which tissues and organs acquire the shape that is critical to their function. My lectures will aim to help you understand the general principles that govern how patterned structures are built in living systems.

The shape of a tissue ‘emerges’ from the behavior of its constituent cells that include changes in number, shape and position. An organ is often built from many tissues. I will first discuss how cells are built and what governs the (often polarized) behaviors of single cells (in unicellular and multicellular organisms). I will highlight the importance of the polarized distribution of specific molecular complexes in generating polarized cell behavior and address how molecular complexes can be polarized.

Building a tissue requires the spatial and temporal coordination of the behaviors of thousands of cells. I will discuss how chemical and physical cues enable cells to sense their neighborhood and modulate their behavior to ensure that the tissue is appropriately patterned. I will discuss the design principles of chemical and physical communication between cells and how they influence each other to control force production and to coordinate tissue deformation and large-scale movements. I will finally discuss how communication between tissues governs the formation of organs. I will discuss the development of ideas and methodologies that have helped our understanding of morphogenesis and how they have paved the way for reverse engineering tissues and organ‘oids’ in a dish.

 

16:00 to 17:30 Vijaykumar Krishnamurthy A condensed matter perspective of development

TBA

Wednesday, 04 December 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Maithreyi Narasimha From cells to tissues: chemical communication

Morphogenesis refers to processes by which tissues and organs acquire the shape that is critical to their function. My lectures will aim to help you understand the general principles that govern how patterned structures are built in living systems.

The shape of a tissue ‘emerges’ from the behavior of its constituent cells that include changes in number, shape and position. An organ is often built from many tissues. I will first discuss how cells are built and what governs the (often polarized) behaviors of single cells (in unicellular and multicellular organisms). I will highlight the importance of the polarized distribution of specific molecular complexes in generating polarized cell behavior and address how molecular complexes can be polarized.

Building a tissue requires the spatial and temporal coordination of the behaviors of thousands of cells. I will discuss how chemical and physical cues enable cells to sense their neighborhood and modulate their behavior to ensure that the tissue is appropriately patterned. I will discuss the design principles of chemical and physical communication between cells and how they influence each other to control force production and to coordinate tissue deformation and large-scale movements. I will finally discuss how communication between tissues governs the formation of organs. I will discuss the development of ideas and methodologies that have helped our understanding of morphogenesis and how they have paved the way for reverse engineering tissues and organ‘oids’ in a dish.

11:30 to 13:00 Vijaykumar Krishnamurthy Random walks, diffusion and stochastic processes

TBA

14:00 to 15:30 Maithreyi Narasimha From cells to tissues: mechanical communication

Morphogenesis refers to processes by which tissues and organs acquire the shape that is critical to their function. My lectures will aim to help you understand the general principles that govern how patterned structures are built in living systems.

The shape of a tissue ‘emerges’ from the behavior of its constituent cells that include changes in number, shape and position. An organ is often built from many tissues. I will first discuss how cells are built and what governs the (often polarized) behaviors of single cells (in unicellular and multicellular organisms). I will highlight the importance of the polarized distribution of specific molecular complexes in generating polarized cell behavior and address how molecular complexes can be polarized.

Building a tissue requires the spatial and temporal coordination of the behaviors of thousands of cells. I will discuss how chemical and physical cues enable cells to sense their neighborhood and modulate their behavior to ensure that the tissue is appropriately patterned. I will discuss the design principles of chemical and physical communication between cells and how they influence each other to control force production and to coordinate tissue deformation and large-scale movements. I will finally discuss how communication between tissues governs the formation of organs. I will discuss the development of ideas and methodologies that have helped our understanding of morphogenesis and how they have paved the way for reverse engineering tissues and organ‘oids’ in a dish.

16:00 to 17:30 Vijaykumar Krishnamurthy Models of gene/protein dynamics, force-generation from polymerization

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Thursday, 05 December 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Maithreyi Narasimha Sculpting tissues, building organs

Morphogenesis refers to processes by which tissues and organs acquire the shape that is critical to their function. My lectures will aim to help you understand the general principles that govern how patterned structures are built in living systems.

The shape of a tissue ‘emerges’ from the behavior of its constituent cells that include changes in number, shape and position. An organ is often built from many tissues. I will first discuss how cells are built and what governs the (often polarized) behaviors of single cells (in unicellular and multicellular organisms). I will highlight the importance of the polarized distribution of specific molecular complexes in generating polarized cell behavior and address how molecular complexes can be polarized.

Building a tissue requires the spatial and temporal coordination of the behaviors of thousands of cells. I will discuss how chemical and physical cues enable cells to sense their neighborhood and modulate their behavior to ensure that the tissue is appropriately patterned. I will discuss the design principles of chemical and physical communication between cells and how they influence each other to control force production and to coordinate tissue deformation and large-scale movements. I will finally discuss how communication between tissues governs the formation of organs. I will discuss the development of ideas and methodologies that have helped our understanding of morphogenesis and how they have paved the way for reverse engineering tissues and organ‘oids’ in a dish.

11:30 to 13:00 Vijaykumar Krishnamurthy Hydrodynamics, mechanochemical patterns

TBA

14:00 to 15:30 Fernando Casares The nature and action of genes (I)

TBA

16:00 to 17:30 Vidyanand Nanjundiah The interplay of development and evolution - I

Developmental Biology used to be called embryology. It deals largely with multicellular development, which, as usually described, is the sequence of events beginning from the fertilised egg to the reproductively mature adult. Since unicellular forms preceded multicellular forms, it is obvious that the sequence must have evolved. Equally, it is obvious that the stages of development given above are incomplete. That is so because, as described, there is no way for the next generation to follow. Therefore the proper unit of development is not the cell, or organism (both of them being conventionally thought of as static entities), or the transition from embryo to adult (for the reason given), but the life cycle. Evolutionary developmental biology, "evo-devo" for short, deals with the development and evolution of life cycles. More than that, evo-devo has come to stand for a point of view that takes into account the manner in which future evolutionary potentialities are shaped by present developmental circumstances. The first of these two talks will present, in outline, a historical perspective on evo-devo and its ongoing transition to "eco-evo-devo"; the second will consider a specific case, namely the evolutionary origin of multicellular development.  On the way we will come across the terms neo-Darwinism (or the Modern Synthesis), epigenetics, plasticity, and noise.

Friday, 06 December 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Maithreyi Narasimha Self organised tissue architecture: morphogenesis in a dish

Morphogenesis refers to processes by which tissues and organs acquire the shape that is critical to their function. My lectures will aim to help you understand the general principles that govern how patterned structures are built in living systems.

The shape of a tissue ‘emerges’ from the behavior of its constituent cells that include changes in number, shape and position. An organ is often built from many tissues. I will first discuss how cells are built and what governs the (often polarized) behaviors of single cells (in unicellular and multicellular organisms). I will highlight the importance of the polarized distribution of specific molecular complexes in generating polarized cell behavior and address how molecular complexes can be polarized.

Building a tissue requires the spatial and temporal coordination of the behaviors of thousands of cells. I will discuss how chemical and physical cues enable cells to sense their neighborhood and modulate their behavior to ensure that the tissue is appropriately patterned. I will discuss the design principles of chemical and physical communication between cells and how they influence each other to control force production and to coordinate tissue deformation and large-scale movements. I will finally discuss how communication between tissues governs the formation of organs. I will discuss the development of ideas and methodologies that have helped our understanding of morphogenesis and how they have paved the way for reverse engineering tissues and organ‘oids’ in a dish.

11:30 to 13:00 Vidyanand Nanjundiah The interplay of development and evolution - II 

Developmental Biology used to be called embryology. It deals largely with multicellular development, which, as usually described, is the sequence of events beginning from the fertilised egg to the reproductively mature adult. Since unicellular forms preceded multicellular forms, it is obvious that the sequence must have evolved. Equally, it is obvious that the stages of development given above are incomplete. That is so because, as described, there is no way for the next generation to follow. Therefore the proper unit of development is not the cell, or organism (both of them being conventionally thought of as static entities), or the transition from embryo to adult (for the reason given), but the life cycle. Evolutionary developmental biology, "evo-devo" for short, deals with the development and evolution of life cycles. More than that, evo-devo has come to stand for a point of view that takes into account the manner in which future evolutionary potentialities are shaped by present developmental circumstances. The first of these two talks will present, in outline, a historical perspective on evo-devo and its ongoing transition to "eco-evo-devo"; the second will consider a specific case, namely the evolutionary origin of multicellular development.  On the way we will come across the terms neo-Darwinism (or the Modern Synthesis), epigenetics, plasticity, and noise. 

14:00 to 15:30 Fernando Casares The nature and action of genes (II): joint gene action and gene networks

TBA

Monday, 09 December 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Mounia Lagha The awakening of the zygotic genome: principles of gene regulation

In this introductory lecture, I will take advantage of the maternal zygotic transition developmental context to introduce the main key concepts of transcriptional regulation.

I will introduce our current definition of enhancers and promoters and how they act to control gene activation in multicellular organisms.

I will primarily use the early drosophila embryo to illustrate these concepts.

Papers: Schulz and Harrison Nature Reviews Genetics, 2018

11:30 to 13:00 Tim Saunders Spatial information and the dynamics of morphogen gradient formation

TBA

14:00 to 16:00 - ‘Reminiscing Suzanne’ and Poster session

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16:00 to 17:30 Frank Jülicher Active processes in cells and tissues

Living matter is highly dynamic and organizes in complex patterns and spatial structures. Fundamental questions of biology are to understand how spatial patterns and morphologies emerge at the scale of cells and at larger scales in multicellular systems. Living systems are driven far from thermodynamic equilibrium by a constant flux of energy via metabolic processes. This activity is at the core of the extraordinary dynamics and the ability of cells and tissues to organize in space and time. At the cell scale, the breaking of symmetries is a key element that underlies the spatial organization of cellular processes. Examples for cell symmetry breaking are cell polarity and cell chirality, which play an important role during the formation of complex organisms. Cell symmetry breaking is often mediated by active dynamical processes. I will discuss fluid flows generated by active processes that provide a key mechanism for cellular symmetry breaking. Such symmetry breaking plays a role in the establishment of the main body axes as well as the left-right asymmetry of developing organisms. Going to larger scales, I will discuss the collective organization of many cells during morphogenesis. Morphogenesis often involves the dynamic remodeling of tissues by active cellular processes that involve cell rearrangements, cell divisions and cell flows. These examples show that cells and tissues are a form of active matter that exhibits original and unconventional dynamics and material properties that play an important role in biological morphogenesis.

 

Tuesday, 10 December 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Mounia Lagha The importance of timing during development

In this lecture, I will present the various methodologies to image gene expression in fixed and living organisms. I will discuss how dynamic studies of transcription have changed our view and provided quantitative knowledge on transcriptional bursting. I will discuss the effect of promoter and enhancer sequences on transcriptional bursting and on temporal coordination in gene activation (synchrony).

Paper: Pichon et al., Mol Cell 2018, Lagha et al., Cell 2013, Bothma et al.,PNAS 2014, Hoppe et al. Biorxiv 2019 (Ashe lab)

11:30 to 13:00 Tim Saunders The role of spatially varying mechanical interactions in morphogenesis

TBA

14:00 to 15:30 Buzz Baum A noisy path to order: the role of noise in developmental refinement (Remote talk)

TBA

16:00 to 17:30 Frank Jülicher Active processes in cells and tissues

Living matter is highly dynamic and organizes in complex patterns and spatial structures. Fundamental questions of biology are to understand how spatial patterns and morphologies emerge at the scale of cells and at larger scales in multicellular systems. Living systems are driven far from thermodynamic equilibrium by a constant flux of energy via metabolic processes. This activity is at the core of the extraordinary dynamics and the ability of cells and tissues to organize in space and time. At the cell scale, the breaking of symmetries is a key element that underlies the spatial organization of cellular processes. Examples for cell symmetry breaking are cell polarity and cell chirality, which play an important role during the formation of complex organisms. Cell symmetry breaking is often mediated by active dynamical processes. I will discuss fluid flows generated by active processes that provide a key mechanism for cellular symmetry breaking. Such symmetry breaking plays a role in the establishment of the main body axes as well as the left-right asymmetry of developing organisms. Going to larger scales, I will discuss the collective organization of many cells during morphogenesis. Morphogenesis often involves the dynamic remodeling of tissues by active cellular processes that involve cell rearrangements, cell divisions and cell flows. These examples show that cells and tissues are a form of active matter that exhibits original and unconventional dynamics and material properties that play an important role in biological morphogenesis.

 

Wednesday, 11 December 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Mounia Lagha Sources of transcriptional precision and functional consequences

In this talk, I will present three main sources of precisions: cis-regulatory elements (enhancers and promoter), mitotic bookmarking/transcriptional memory and nuclear organization in local microenvironments (condensates?). I will use the latest results from the literature as well as some unpublished work from my lab.

 

papers: Ferraro et al., Current Biology 2006; Dufourt et al., Nature Com 2018; Fukaya et al., Cell 2016; Cardozo et al., Mol Cell 2019; Hnisz et al., Cell 2017.

Bellec Current Opinions in Systems Biology 2018

 

11:30 to 13:00 Fernando Casares From organizational principles of Development to the morphospace (this might be Lecture 2 of Pre-school if we had time).

TBA

14:00 to 15:30 Tim Saunders Chemical and mechanical feedback in regulating morphogenesis

TBA

16:00 to 17:30 Frank Jülicher Active processes in cells and tissues

Living matter is highly dynamic and organizes in complex patterns and spatial structures. Fundamental questions of biology are to understand how spatial patterns and morphologies emerge at the scale of cells and at larger scales in multicellular systems. Living systems are driven far from thermodynamic equilibrium by a constant flux of energy via metabolic processes. This activity is at the core of the extraordinary dynamics and the ability of cells and tissues to organize in space and time. At the cell scale, the breaking of symmetries is a key element that underlies the spatial organization of cellular processes. Examples for cell symmetry breaking are cell polarity and cell chirality, which play an important role during the formation of complex organisms. Cell symmetry breaking is often mediated by active dynamical processes. I will discuss fluid flows generated by active processes that provide a key mechanism for cellular symmetry breaking. Such symmetry breaking plays a role in the establishment of the main body axes as well as the left-right asymmetry of developing organisms. Going to larger scales, I will discuss the collective organization of many cells during morphogenesis. Morphogenesis often involves the dynamic remodeling of tissues by active cellular processes that involve cell rearrangements, cell divisions and cell flows. These examples show that cells and tissues are a form of active matter that exhibits original and unconventional dynamics and material properties that play an important role in biological morphogenesis.

 

Thursday, 12 December 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Guillaume Salbreux Tissues as active fluids

TBA

11:30 to 13:00 Fernando Casares The problems of organ size control: termination, variation, relative and precision.

Example 1: size without tissue growth; Example 2: termination of organ growth.

14:00 to 15:30 Buzz Baum The evolution of development: an in silico study (Remote talk)
16:00 to 17:30 Frank Jülicher Active processes in cells and tissues

Living matter is highly dynamic and organizes in complex patterns and spatial structures. Fundamental questions of biology are to understand how spatial patterns and morphologies emerge at the scale of cells and at larger scales in multicellular systems. Living systems are driven far from thermodynamic equilibrium by a constant flux of energy via metabolic processes. This activity is at the core of the extraordinary dynamics and the ability of cells and tissues to organize in space and time. At the cell scale, the breaking of symmetries is a key element that underlies the spatial organization of cellular processes. Examples for cell symmetry breaking are cell polarity and cell chirality, which play an important role during the formation of complex organisms. Cell symmetry breaking is often mediated by active dynamical processes. I will discuss fluid flows generated by active processes that provide a key mechanism for cellular symmetry breaking. Such symmetry breaking plays a role in the establishment of the main body axes as well as the left-right asymmetry of developing organisms. Going to larger scales, I will discuss the collective organization of many cells during morphogenesis. Morphogenesis often involves the dynamic remodeling of tissues by active cellular processes that involve cell rearrangements, cell divisions and cell flows. These examples show that cells and tissues are a form of active matter that exhibits original and unconventional dynamics and material properties that play an important role in biological morphogenesis.

 

Friday, 13 December 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Guillaume Salbreux Tissues as active fluids

TBA

11:30 to 13:00 Fernando Casares Evolutionary variation of organ size; Control of size precision; algorithmic approximation to the morphospace of a branching patterning mechanism.

TBA

14:00 to 15:30 Guillaume Salbreux Active surfaces, folds, differential geometry

TBA

16:00 to 17:30 Tim Saunders Combining biochemical and biomechanical information to shape organs

TBA

Monday, 16 December 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Matteo Rauzi Resolving cell intercalation in epithelia: an important process for tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis

TBA

11:30 to 13:00 Vikas Trivedi The evolution of body axes: A synthetic approach

TBA

14:00 to 15:30 Karen Alim Physics of flow networks (Remote talk)
  1. Organization of flows in living flow networks

  2. Transport in long slender tubes: Taylor dispersion

  3. Flows in networks

  4. Flow-based supply into tissues

16:00 to 17:30 -- Poster Session

Posters 

Tuesday, 17 December 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Matteo Rauzi AP-DV patterning synergy in cell shape change and tissue morphogenesis

TBA

11:30 to 13:00 Jochen Rink Self-organization in planarian flatworms and other biological systems

TBA

14:00 to 15:30 Karen Alim Physics of flow networks (Remote talk)

TBA

16:00 to 17:30 William Bialek Positional information, more rigorously.

TBA

18:00 to 19:30 Buzz Baum This is a mentoring discussion session meant for interested students/postdocs (Remote talk) 

TBA

Wednesday, 18 December 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Matteo Rauzi A filopodia mediated supracellular network drives polarized forces and tissue extension

TBA

11:30 to 13:00 Jochen Rink Multi-scale coordination of cell polarity

TBA

14:00 to 15:30 Stefano Di Talia Chemical waves (unstable, bistable, excitable)

In this lecture, I will present the basic theory of chemical waves

16:00 to 17:30 William Bialek The fly embryo as a physics lab: Why precision matters

TBA

18:00 to 19:30 Buzz Baum The evolution and mechanics of cell division (Remote talk)

TBA

Thursday, 19 December 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Yasmine Meroz Dynamics of rod-like sensory-growth systems: from plants to neurons

TBA

11:30 to 13:00 Jochen Rink Size constraints in biological systems

TBA

14:00 to 15:30 Stefano Di Talia Waves in early embryogenesis

In this lecture, I will discuss the importance of waves in organizing early embryogenesis in particular in relation to the organization of cleavage divisions 

16:00 to 17:30 William Bialek Optimizing the flow of positional information

TBA

Friday, 20 December 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Yasmine Meroz Dynamics of rod-like sensory-growth systems: from plants to neurons

TBA

11:30 to 13:00 Vikas Trivedi Modularity in Biology: Formation of tubular structures

TBA

14:00 to 15:30 Stefano Di Talia Waves in tissue regeneration

In this lecture, I will discuss the role of waves in organizing dynamics in complex large tissue and show an application to tissue regeneration in zebrafish

16:00 to 17:30 William Bialek Outlook: From enhancers to networks

TBA