Monday, 15 July 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Teruaki Suyama Course 1 Primordial black holes and gravitational wave astronomy

Introduction: Why primordial black holes (PBHs) are important in cosmology. Formation of PBHs: Threshold of the PBH formation, abundance of PBHs, generating seeds of PBH from inflation. Observational constraints on the abundance of PBHs. PBHs as sources of gravitational waves:Mechanism of the PBH binary formation, merger rate, tests of the PBH hypothesis by the future GW observations

References: 

  1. M. Sasaki et al, Class. Quant. Grav. 35 (2018), 063001 [arXiv:1801.05235]
11:00 to 11:30 -- Tea/coffee break
11:30 to 13:00 Sudipta Sarkar Course 2 Advanced course in general relativity

Riemann, Ricci and Einstein Tensor, the Einstein field equation, Energy-Momentum tensor, Spherically symmetric asymptotically flat vacuum solution, The Schwarzschild Geometry, Eddington-Finkelstein coordinates. Timelike geodesics of Schwarzschild Geometry. Effective potential and nature of timelike obits. Null geodesics, Photon Sphere and shadow of Schwarzschild black hole. Introduction to Kerr solution. Dragging of Inertial Frames & ZAMO, Ergosphere, and the event horizon, Penrose Process.  Linearized Einstein Equation. Gauge freedoms, Gravitational radiation, Energy loss by gravitation wave emission.

References: 

  1. Sean Carrol, Lectures notes on general relativity (gr-qc/9712019) 
  2. Eric Poisson, A Relativist’s Toolkit (Cambridge University Press) 
  3. S Chandrasekhar, The Mathematical Theory of Black Holes (Oxford)
13:00 to 14:00 - Lunch
14:00 to 15:30 Teruaki Suyama Course 1 Primordial black holes and gravitational wave astronomy

Introduction: Why primordial black holes (PBHs) are important in cosmology. Formation of PBHs: Threshold of the PBH formation, abundance of PBHs, generating seeds of PBH from inflation. Observational constraints on the abundance of PBHs. PBHs as sources of gravitational waves:Mechanism of the PBH binary formation, merger rate, tests of the PBH hypothesis by the future GW observations

References: 

  1. M. Sasaki et al, Class. Quant. Grav. 35 (2018), 063001 [arXiv:1801.05235]
15:30 to 16:00 - Tea/coffee break
16:00 to 17:30 Sudipta Sarkar Course 2 Advanced course in general relativity

Riemann, Ricci and Einstein Tensor, the Einstein field equation, Energy-Momentum tensor, Spherically symmetric asymptotically flat vacuum solution, The Schwarzschild Geometry, Eddington-Finkelstein coordinates. Timelike geodesics of Schwarzschild Geometry. Effective potential and nature of timelike obits. Null geodesics, Photon Sphere and shadow of Schwarzschild black hole. Introduction to Kerr solution. Dragging of Inertial Frames & ZAMO, Ergosphere, and the event horizon, Penrose Process.  Linearized Einstein Equation. Gauge freedoms, Gravitational radiation, Energy loss by gravitation wave emission.

References: 

  1. Sean Carrol, Lectures notes on general relativity (gr-qc/9712019) 
  2. Eric Poisson, A Relativist’s Toolkit (Cambridge University Press) 
  3. S Chandrasekhar, The Mathematical Theory of Black Holes (Oxford)
Tuesday, 16 July 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Teruaki Suyama Course 1 Primordial black holes and gravitational wave astronomy

Introduction: Why primordial black holes (PBHs) are important in cosmology. Formation of PBHs: Threshold of the PBH formation, abundance of PBHs, generating seeds of PBH from inflation. Observational constraints on the abundance of PBHs. PBHs as sources of gravitational waves:Mechanism of the PBH binary formation, merger rate, tests of the PBH hypothesis by the future GW observations

References: 

  1. M. Sasaki et al, Class. Quant. Grav. 35 (2018), 063001 [arXiv:1801.05235]
11:00 to 11:30 - Tea/coffee break
11:30 to 13:00 Sudipta Sarkar Course 2 Advanced course in general relativity

Riemann, Ricci and Einstein Tensor, the Einstein field equation, Energy-Momentum tensor, Spherically symmetric asymptotically flat vacuum solution, The Schwarzschild Geometry, Eddington-Finkelstein coordinates. Timelike geodesics of Schwarzschild Geometry. Effective potential and nature of timelike obits. Null geodesics, Photon Sphere and shadow of Schwarzschild black hole. Introduction to Kerr solution. Dragging of Inertial Frames & ZAMO, Ergosphere, and the event horizon, Penrose Process.  Linearized Einstein Equation. Gauge freedoms, Gravitational radiation, Energy loss by gravitation wave emission.

References: 

  1. Sean Carrol, Lectures notes on general relativity (gr-qc/9712019) 
  2. Eric Poisson, A Relativist’s Toolkit (Cambridge University Press) 
  3. S Chandrasekhar, The Mathematical Theory of Black Holes (Oxford)
13:00 to 14:00 - Lunch
14:00 to 15:30 Teruaki Suyama Course 1 Primordial black holes and gravitational wave astronomy

ntroduction: Why primordial black holes (PBHs) are important in cosmology. Formation of PBHs: Threshold of the PBH formation, abundance of PBHs, generating seeds of PBH from inflation. Observational constraints on the abundance of PBHs. PBHs as sources of gravitational waves:Mechanism of the PBH binary formation, merger rate, tests of the PBH hypothesis by the future GW observations

References: 

  1. M. Sasaki et al, Class. Quant. Grav. 35 (2018), 063001 [arXiv:1801.05235]
15:30 to 16:00 - Tea/coffee break
16:00 to 17:30 Sudipta Sarkar Course 2 Advanced course in general relativity

Riemann, Ricci and Einstein Tensor, the Einstein field equation, Energy-Momentum tensor, Spherically symmetric asymptotically flat vacuum solution, The Schwarzschild Geometry, Eddington-Finkelstein coordinates. Timelike geodesics of Schwarzschild Geometry. Effective potential and nature of timelike obits. Null geodesics, Photon Sphere and shadow of Schwarzschild black hole. Introduction to Kerr solution. Dragging of Inertial Frames & ZAMO, Ergosphere, and the event horizon, Penrose Process.  Linearized Einstein Equation. Gauge freedoms, Gravitational radiation, Energy loss by gravitation wave emission.

References: 

  1. Sean Carrol, Lectures notes on general relativity (gr-qc/9712019) 
  2. Eric Poisson, A Relativist’s Toolkit (Cambridge University Press) 
  3. S Chandrasekhar, The Mathematical Theory of Black Holes (Oxford)
Wednesday, 17 July 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Teruaki Suyama Course 1 Primordial black holes and gravitational wave astronomy

ntroduction: Why primordial black holes (PBHs) are important in cosmology. Formation of PBHs: Threshold of the PBH formation, abundance of PBHs, generating seeds of PBH from inflation. Observational constraints on the abundance of PBHs. PBHs as sources of gravitational waves:Mechanism of the PBH binary formation, merger rate, tests of the PBH hypothesis by the future GW observations

References: 

  1. M. Sasaki et al, Class. Quant. Grav. 35 (2018), 063001 [arXiv:1801.05235]
11:00 to 11:30 - Tea/coffee break
11:30 to 13:00 Sudipta Sarkar Course 2 Advanced course in general relativity

Riemann, Ricci and Einstein Tensor, the Einstein field equation, Energy-Momentum tensor, Spherically symmetric asymptotically flat vacuum solution, The Schwarzschild Geometry, Eddington-Finkelstein coordinates. Timelike geodesics of Schwarzschild Geometry. Effective potential and nature of timelike obits. Null geodesics, Photon Sphere and shadow of Schwarzschild black hole. Introduction to Kerr solution. Dragging of Inertial Frames & ZAMO, Ergosphere, and the event horizon, Penrose Process.  Linearized Einstein Equation. Gauge freedoms, Gravitational radiation, Energy loss by gravitation wave emission.

References: 

  1. Sean Carrol, Lectures notes on general relativity (gr-qc/9712019) 
  2. Eric Poisson, A Relativist’s Toolkit (Cambridge University Press) 
  3. S Chandrasekhar, The Mathematical Theory of Black Holes (Oxford)
13:00 to 14:00 - Lunch
14:00 to 15:30 Teruaki Suyama Course 1 Primordial black holes and gravitational wave astronomy

Introduction: Why primordial black holes (PBHs) are important in cosmology. Formation of PBHs: Threshold of the PBH formation, abundance of PBHs, generating seeds of PBH from inflation. Observational constraints on the abundance of PBHs. PBHs as sources of gravitational waves:Mechanism of the PBH binary formation, merger rate, tests of the PBH hypothesis by the future GW observations

References: 

  1. M. Sasaki et al, Class. Quant. Grav. 35 (2018), 063001 [arXiv:1801.05235]
15:30 to 16:00 - Tea/coffee break
16:00 to 17:30 Sudipta Sarkar Course 2 Advanced course in general relativity

Riemann, Ricci and Einstein Tensor, the Einstein field equation, Energy-Momentum tensor, Spherically symmetric asymptotically flat vacuum solution, The Schwarzschild Geometry, Eddington-Finkelstein coordinates. Timelike geodesics of Schwarzschild Geometry. Effective potential and nature of timelike obits. Null geodesics, Photon Sphere and shadow of Schwarzschild black hole. Introduction to Kerr solution. Dragging of Inertial Frames & ZAMO, Ergosphere, and the event horizon, Penrose Process.  Linearized Einstein Equation. Gauge freedoms, Gravitational radiation, Energy loss by gravitation wave emission.

References: 

  1. Sean Carrol, Lectures notes on general relativity (gr-qc/9712019) 
  2. Eric Poisson, A Relativist’s Toolkit (Cambridge University Press) 
  3. S Chandrasekhar, The Mathematical Theory of Black Holes (Oxford)
Thursday, 18 July 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Teruaki Suyama Course 1 Primordial black holes and gravitational wave astronomy

Introduction: Why primordial black holes (PBHs) are important in cosmology. Formation of PBHs: Threshold of the PBH formation, abundance of PBHs, generating seeds of PBH from inflation. Observational constraints on the abundance of PBHs. PBHs as sources of gravitational waves:Mechanism of the PBH binary formation, merger rate, tests of the PBH hypothesis by the future GW observations

References: 

  1. M. Sasaki et al, Class. Quant. Grav. 35 (2018), 063001 [arXiv:1801.05235]
11:00 to 11:30 - Tea/coffee break
11:30 to 13:00 Sudipta Sarkar Course 2 Advanced course in general relativity

Riemann, Ricci and Einstein Tensor, the Einstein field equation, Energy-Momentum tensor, Spherically symmetric asymptotically flat vacuum solution, The Schwarzschild Geometry, Eddington-Finkelstein coordinates. Timelike geodesics of Schwarzschild Geometry. Effective potential and nature of timelike obits. Null geodesics, Photon Sphere and shadow of Schwarzschild black hole. Introduction to Kerr solution. Dragging of Inertial Frames & ZAMO, Ergosphere, and the event horizon, Penrose Process.  Linearized Einstein Equation. Gauge freedoms, Gravitational radiation, Energy loss by gravitation wave emission.

References: 

  1. Sean Carrol, Lectures notes on general relativity (gr-qc/9712019) 
  2. Eric Poisson, A Relativist’s Toolkit (Cambridge University Press) 
  3. S Chandrasekhar, The Mathematical Theory of Black Holes (Oxford)
13:00 to 14:00 - Lunch
14:00 to 15:30 Teruaki Suyama Course 1 Primordial black holes and gravitational wave astronomy

Introduction: Why primordial black holes (PBHs) are important in cosmology. Formation of PBHs: Threshold of the PBH formation, abundance of PBHs, generating seeds of PBH from inflation. Observational constraints on the abundance of PBHs. PBHs as sources of gravitational waves:Mechanism of the PBH binary formation, merger rate, tests of the PBH hypothesis by the future GW observations

References: 

  1. M. Sasaki et al, Class. Quant. Grav. 35 (2018), 063001 [arXiv:1801.05235]
15:30 to 16:00 - Tea/coffee break
16:00 to 17:30 Sudipta Sarkar Course 2 Advanced course in general relativity

Riemann, Ricci and Einstein Tensor, the Einstein field equation, Energy-Momentum tensor, Spherically symmetric asymptotically flat vacuum solution, The Schwarzschild Geometry, Eddington-Finkelstein coordinates. Timelike geodesics of Schwarzschild Geometry. Effective potential and nature of timelike obits. Null geodesics, Photon Sphere and shadow of Schwarzschild black hole. Introduction to Kerr solution. Dragging of Inertial Frames & ZAMO, Ergosphere, and the event horizon, Penrose Process.  Linearized Einstein Equation. Gauge freedoms, Gravitational radiation, Energy loss by gravitation wave emission.

References: 

  1. Sean Carrol, Lectures notes on general relativity (gr-qc/9712019) 
  2. Eric Poisson, A Relativist’s Toolkit (Cambridge University Press) 
  3. S Chandrasekhar, The Mathematical Theory of Black Holes (Oxford)
Friday, 19 July 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Teruaki Suyama Course 1 Primordial black holes and gravitational wave astronomy

Introduction: Why primordial black holes (PBHs) are important in cosmology. Formation of PBHs: Threshold of the PBH formation, abundance of PBHs, generating seeds of PBH from inflation. Observational constraints on the abundance of PBHs. PBHs as sources of gravitational waves:Mechanism of the PBH binary formation, merger rate, tests of the PBH hypothesis by the future GW observations

References: 

  1. M. Sasaki et al, Class. Quant. Grav. 35 (2018), 063001 [arXiv:1801.05235]
11:00 to 11:30 - Tea/coffee break
11:30 to 13:00 Sudipta Sarkar Course 2 Advanced course in general relativity

Riemann, Ricci and Einstein Tensor, the Einstein field equation, Energy-Momentum tensor, Spherically symmetric asymptotically flat vacuum solution, The Schwarzschild Geometry, Eddington-Finkelstein coordinates. Timelike geodesics of Schwarzschild Geometry. Effective potential and nature of timelike obits. Null geodesics, Photon Sphere and shadow of Schwarzschild black hole. Introduction to Kerr solution. Dragging of Inertial Frames & ZAMO, Ergosphere, and the event horizon, Penrose Process.  Linearized Einstein Equation. Gauge freedoms, Gravitational radiation, Energy loss by gravitation wave emission.

References: 

  1. Sean Carrol, Lectures notes on general relativity (gr-qc/9712019) 
  2. Eric Poisson, A Relativist’s Toolkit (Cambridge University Press) 
  3. S Chandrasekhar, The Mathematical Theory of Black Holes (Oxford)
13:00 to 14:00 - LUnch
14:00 to 15:30 Teruaki Suyama Course 1 Primordial black holes and gravitational wave astronomy

Introduction: Why primordial black holes (PBHs) are important in cosmology. Formation of PBHs: Threshold of the PBH formation, abundance of PBHs, generating seeds of PBH from inflation. Observational constraints on the abundance of PBHs. PBHs as sources of gravitational waves:Mechanism of the PBH binary formation, merger rate, tests of the PBH hypothesis by the future GW observations

References: 

  1. M. Sasaki et al, Class. Quant. Grav. 35 (2018), 063001 [arXiv:1801.05235]
15:30 to 16:00 - Tea/coffee break
16:00 to 17:30 Sudipta Sarkar Course 2 Advanced course in general relativity

Riemann, Ricci and Einstein Tensor, the Einstein field equation, Energy-Momentum tensor, Spherically symmetric asymptotically flat vacuum solution, The Schwarzschild Geometry, Eddington-Finkelstein coordinates. Timelike geodesics of Schwarzschild Geometry. Effective potential and nature of timelike obits. Null geodesics, Photon Sphere and shadow of Schwarzschild black hole. Introduction to Kerr solution. Dragging of Inertial Frames & ZAMO, Ergosphere, and the event horizon, Penrose Process.  Linearized Einstein Equation. Gauge freedoms, Gravitational radiation, Energy loss by gravitation wave emission.

References: 

  1. Sean Carrol, Lectures notes on general relativity (gr-qc/9712019) 
  2. Eric Poisson, A Relativist’s Toolkit (Cambridge University Press) 
  3. S Chandrasekhar, The Mathematical Theory of Black Holes (Oxford)
Monday, 22 July 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Luc Blanchet Course 3 Gravitational radiation from post-Newtonian sources and inspiralling compact binaries

Quadrupole formula, effect of GWs on matter, problem of the generation of GWs; and more advanced ones: post-Newtonian methods, the multipolar post-Minkowskian expansion, problem of motion, applications to compact binary systems, Fokker Lagrangian and Hamiltonian, effects of spins and internal structure.

References: 

  1. L. Blanchet, Living Rev. Relativ. (2014) 17: 2. https://doi.org/10.12942/lrr-2014-2
11:00 to 11:30 - Tea/coffee break
11:30 to 13:00 Adam Pound Course 4 Self-force and radiation reaction in general relativity

Overview of extreme mass ratio inspirals.  Perturbation theory in GR. Orbital dynamics in Schwarzschild and Kerr spacetime. The adiabatic approximation. Foundations of self-force theory: matched asymptotic expansions. Practical methods: puncture scheme and mode-sum regularization. 

References: 

  1. Leor Barack, Adam Pound, Self-force and radiation reaction in general relativity, arXiv:1805.10385 [gr-qc]. 
13:00 to 14:00 - Lunch
14:00 to 15:30 Luc Blanchet Course 3 Gravitational radiation from post-Newtonian sources and inspiralling compact binaries

Quadrupole formula, effect of GWs on matter, problem of the generation of GWs; and more advanced ones: post-Newtonian methods, the multipolar post-Minkowskian expansion, problem of motion, applications to compact binary systems, Fokker Lagrangian and Hamiltonian, effects of spins and internal structure.

References: 

  1. L. Blanchet, Living Rev. Relativ. (2014) 17: 2. https://doi.org/10.12942/lrr-2014-2

Preparatory material: 

  1. Kip S. Thorne, "Gravitational Radiation," in Three Hundred Years of Gravitation, ed. S.W. Hawking and W. Israel (Cambridge University Press, 1987), pp. 330-458.
  2. Michele Maggiore, Gravitational Waves: Volume 1: Theory and Experiments (Cambridge University Press)
  3. Misner, Thorne, Wheeler, Gravitation (Princeton University Press) [Chapters 18 (weak gravitational fields), 35 (propagation of GWs), 36 (generation of GWs) and Exercises: 35.1, 35.2, 35.15, 36.2, 36.5, 36.6, 36.8, 36.9]
15:30 to 16:00 - Tea/coffee break
16:00 to 17:30 Adam Pound Course 4 Self-force and radiation reaction in general relativity

Overview of extreme mass ratio inspirals.  Perturbation theory in GR. Orbital dynamics in Schwarzschild and Kerr spacetime. The adiabatic approximation. Foundations of self-force theory: matched asymptotic expansions. Practical methods: puncture scheme and mode-sum regularization. 

References: 

  1. Leor Barack, Adam Pound, Self-force and radiation reaction in general relativity, arXiv:1805.10385 [gr-qc]. 
Tuesday, 23 July 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Luc Blanchet Course 3 Gravitational radiation from post-Newtonian sources and inspiralling compact binaries

Quadrupole formula, effect of GWs on matter, problem of the generation of GWs; and more advanced ones: post-Newtonian methods, the multipolar post-Minkowskian expansion, problem of motion, applications to compact binary systems, Fokker Lagrangian and Hamiltonian, effects of spins and internal structure.

References: 

  1. L. Blanchet, Living Rev. Relativ. (2014) 17: 2. https://doi.org/10.12942/lrr-2014-2

Preparatory material: 

  1. Kip S. Thorne, "Gravitational Radiation," in Three Hundred Years of Gravitation, ed. S.W. Hawking and W. Israel (Cambridge University Press, 1987), pp. 330-458.
  2. Michele Maggiore, Gravitational Waves: Volume 1: Theory and Experiments (Cambridge University Press)
  3. Misner, Thorne, Wheeler, Gravitation (Princeton University Press) [Chapters 18 (weak gravitational fields), 35 (propagation of GWs), 36 (generation of GWs) and Exercises: 35.1, 35.2, 35.15, 36.2, 36.5, 36.6, 36.8, 36.9]
11:00 to 11:30 - Tea/coffee break
11:30 to 13:00 Adam Pound Course 4 Self-force and radiation reaction in general relativity

Overview of extreme mass ratio inspirals.  Perturbation theory in GR. Orbital dynamics in Schwarzschild and Kerr spacetime. The adiabatic approximation. Foundations of self-force theory: matched asymptotic expansions. Practical methods: puncture scheme and mode-sum regularization. 

References: 

  1. Leor Barack, Adam Pound, Self-force and radiation reaction in general relativity, arXiv:1805.10385 [gr-qc]. 
13:00 to 14:00 - Lunch
14:00 to 15:30 Luc Blanchet Course 3 Gravitational radiation from post-Newtonian sources and inspiralling compact binaries

Quadrupole formula, effect of GWs on matter, problem of the generation of GWs; and more advanced ones: post-Newtonian methods, the multipolar post-Minkowskian expansion, problem of motion, applications to compact binary systems, Fokker Lagrangian and Hamiltonian, effects of spins and internal structure.

References: 

  1. L. Blanchet, Living Rev. Relativ. (2014) 17: 2. https://doi.org/10.12942/lrr-2014-2

Preparatory material: 

  1. Kip S. Thorne, "Gravitational Radiation," in Three Hundred Years of Gravitation, ed. S.W. Hawking and W. Israel (Cambridge University Press, 1987), pp. 330-458.
  2. Michele Maggiore, Gravitational Waves: Volume 1: Theory and Experiments (Cambridge University Press)
  3. Misner, Thorne, Wheeler, Gravitation (Princeton University Press) [Chapters 18 (weak gravitational fields), 35 (propagation of GWs), 36 (generation of GWs) and Exercises: 35.1, 35.2, 35.15, 36.2, 36.5, 36.6, 36.8, 36.9]
15:30 to 16:00 - Tea/coffee break
16:00 to 17:30 Adam Pound Course 4 Self-force and radiation reaction in general relativity

Overview of extreme mass ratio inspirals.  Perturbation theory in GR. Orbital dynamics in Schwarzschild and Kerr spacetime. The adiabatic approximation. Foundations of self-force theory: matched asymptotic expansions. Practical methods: puncture scheme and mode-sum regularization. 

References: 

  1. Leor Barack, Adam Pound, Self-force and radiation reaction in general relativity, arXiv:1805.10385 [gr-qc]. 
Wednesday, 24 July 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Luc Blanchet Course 3 Gravitational radiation from post-Newtonian sources and inspiralling compact binaries

Quadrupole formula, effect of GWs on matter, problem of the generation of GWs; and more advanced ones: post-Newtonian methods, the multipolar post-Minkowskian expansion, problem of motion, applications to compact binary systems, Fokker Lagrangian and Hamiltonian, effects of spins and internal structure.

References: 

  1. L. Blanchet, Living Rev. Relativ. (2014) 17: 2. https://doi.org/10.12942/lrr-2014-2

Preparatory material: 

  1. Kip S. Thorne, "Gravitational Radiation," in Three Hundred Years of Gravitation, ed. S.W. Hawking and W. Israel (Cambridge University Press, 1987), pp. 330-458.
  2. Michele Maggiore, Gravitational Waves: Volume 1: Theory and Experiments (Cambridge University Press)
  3. Misner, Thorne, Wheeler, Gravitation (Princeton University Press) [Chapters 18 (weak gravitational fields), 35 (propagation of GWs), 36 (generation of GWs) and Exercises: 35.1, 35.2, 35.15, 36.2, 36.5, 36.6, 36.8, 36.9]
11:00 to 11:30 - Tea/coffee break
11:30 to 13:00 Adam Pound Course 4 Self-force and radiation reaction in general relativity

Overview of extreme mass ratio inspirals.  Perturbation theory in GR. Orbital dynamics in Schwarzschild and Kerr spacetime. The adiabatic approximation. Foundations of self-force theory: matched asymptotic expansions. Practical methods: puncture scheme and mode-sum regularization. 

References: 

  1. Leor Barack, Adam Pound, Self-force and radiation reaction in general relativity, arXiv:1805.10385 [gr-qc]. 
13:00 to 14:00 - Lunch
14:00 to 15:30 Luc Blanchet Course 3 Gravitational radiation from post-Newtonian sources and inspiralling compact binaries

Quadrupole formula, effect of GWs on matter, problem of the generation of GWs; and more advanced ones: post-Newtonian methods, the multipolar post-Minkowskian expansion, problem of motion, applications to compact binary systems, Fokker Lagrangian and Hamiltonian, effects of spins and internal structure.

References: 

  1. L. Blanchet, Living Rev. Relativ. (2014) 17: 2. https://doi.org/10.12942/lrr-2014-2
15:30 to 16:00 - Tea/coffee break
16:00 to 17:30 Adam Pound Course 4 Self-force and radiation reaction in general relativity

Overview of extreme mass ratio inspirals.  Perturbation theory in GR. Orbital dynamics in Schwarzschild and Kerr spacetime. The adiabatic approximation. Foundations of self-force theory: matched asymptotic expansions. Practical methods: puncture scheme and mode-sum regularization. 

References: 

  1. Leor Barack, Adam Pound, Self-force and radiation reaction in general relativity, arXiv:1805.10385 [gr-qc]. 
Thursday, 25 July 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Luc Blanchet Course 3 Gravitational radiation from post-Newtonian sources and inspiralling compact binaries

Quadrupole formula, effect of GWs on matter, problem of the generation of GWs; and more advanced ones: post-Newtonian methods, the multipolar post-Minkowskian expansion, problem of motion, applications to compact binary systems, Fokker Lagrangian and Hamiltonian, effects of spins and internal structure.

References: 

  1. L. Blanchet, Living Rev. Relativ. (2014) 17: 2. https://doi.org/10.12942/lrr-2014-2

Preparatory material: 

  1. Kip S. Thorne, "Gravitational Radiation," in Three Hundred Years of Gravitation, ed. S.W. Hawking and W. Israel (Cambridge University Press, 1987), pp. 330-458.
  2. Michele Maggiore, Gravitational Waves: Volume 1: Theory and Experiments (Cambridge University Press)
  3. Misner, Thorne, Wheeler, Gravitation (Princeton University Press) [Chapters 18 (weak gravitational fields), 35 (propagation of GWs), 36 (generation of GWs) and Exercises: 35.1, 35.2, 35.15, 36.2, 36.5, 36.6, 36.8, 36.9]
11:00 to 11:30 - Tea/coffee break
11:30 to 13:00 Adam Pound Course 4 Self-force and radiation reaction in general relativity

Overview of extreme mass ratio inspirals.  Perturbation theory in GR. Orbital dynamics in Schwarzschild and Kerr spacetime. The adiabatic approximation. Foundations of self-force theory: matched asymptotic expansions. Practical methods: puncture scheme and mode-sum regularization. 

References: 

  1. Leor Barack, Adam Pound, Self-force and radiation reaction in general relativity, arXiv:1805.10385 [gr-qc]. 
13:00 to 14:00 - Lunch
14:00 to 15:30 Luc Blanchet Course 3 Gravitational radiation from post-Newtonian sources and inspiralling compact binaries

Quadrupole formula, effect of GWs on matter, problem of the generation of GWs; and more advanced ones: post-Newtonian methods, the multipolar post-Minkowskian expansion, problem of motion, applications to compact binary systems, Fokker Lagrangian and Hamiltonian, effects of spins and internal structure.

References: 

  1. L. Blanchet, Living Rev. Relativ. (2014) 17: 2. https://doi.org/10.12942/lrr-2014-2

Preparatory material: 

  1. Kip S. Thorne, "Gravitational Radiation," in Three Hundred Years of Gravitation, ed. S.W. Hawking and W. Israel (Cambridge University Press, 1987), pp. 330-458.
  2. Michele Maggiore, Gravitational Waves: Volume 1: Theory and Experiments (Cambridge University Press)
  3. Misner, Thorne, Wheeler, Gravitation (Princeton University Press) [Chapters 18 (weak gravitational fields), 35 (propagation of GWs), 36 (generation of GWs) and Exercises: 35.1, 35.2, 35.15, 36.2, 36.5, 36.6, 36.8, 36.9]

Self-force and radiation reaction in general relativity

15:30 to 16:00 - Tea/coffee break
16:00 to 17:30 Adam Pound Course 4 Self-force and radiation reaction in general relativity

Overview of extreme mass ratio inspirals.  Perturbation theory in GR. Orbital dynamics in Schwarzschild and Kerr spacetime. The adiabatic approximation. Foundations of self-force theory: matched asymptotic expansions. Practical methods: puncture scheme and mode-sum regularization. 

References: 

  1. Leor Barack, Adam Pound, Self-force and radiation reaction in general relativity, arXiv:1805.10385 [gr-qc]. 
Friday, 26 July 2019
Time Speaker Title Resources
09:30 to 11:00 Luc Blanchet Course 3 Gravitational radiation from post-Newtonian sources and inspiralling compact binaries

Quadrupole formula, effect of GWs on matter, problem of the generation of GWs; and more advanced ones: post-Newtonian methods, the multipolar post-Minkowskian expansion, problem of motion, applications to compact binary systems, Fokker Lagrangian and Hamiltonian, effects of spins and internal structure.

References: 

  1. L. Blanchet, Living Rev. Relativ. (2014) 17: 2. https://doi.org/10.12942/lrr-2014-2

Preparatory material: 

  1. Kip S. Thorne, "Gravitational Radiation," in Three Hundred Years of Gravitation, ed. S.W. Hawking and W. Israel (Cambridge University Press, 1987), pp. 330-458.
  2. Michele Maggiore, Gravitational Waves: Volume 1: Theory and Experiments (Cambridge University Press)
  3. Misner, Thorne, Wheeler, Gravitation (Princeton University Press) [Chapters 18 (weak gravitational fields), 35 (propagation of GWs), 36 (generation of GWs) and Exercises: 35.1, 35.2, 35.15, 36.2, 36.5, 36.6, 36.8, 36.9]
11:00 to 11:30 - Tea/coffee break
11:30 to 13:00 Adam Pound Course 4 Self-force and radiation reaction in general relativity

Overview of extreme mass ratio inspirals.  Perturbation theory in GR. Orbital dynamics in Schwarzschild and Kerr spacetime. The adiabatic approximation. Foundations of self-force theory: matched asymptotic expansions. Practical methods: puncture scheme and mode-sum regularization. 

References: 

  1. Leor Barack, Adam Pound, Self-force and radiation reaction in general relativity, arXiv:1805.10385 [gr-qc]. 
13:00 to 14:00 - Lunch
14:00 to 15:30 Luc Blanchet Course 3 Gravitational radiation from post-Newtonian sources and inspiralling compact binaries

Quadrupole formula, effect of GWs on matter, problem of the generation of GWs; and more advanced ones: post-Newtonian methods, the multipolar post-Minkowskian expansion, problem of motion, applications to compact binary systems, Fokker Lagrangian and Hamiltonian, effects of spins and internal structure.

References: 

  1. L. Blanchet, Living Rev. Relativ. (2014) 17: 2. https://doi.org/10.12942/lrr-2014-2

Preparatory material: 

  1. Kip S. Thorne, "Gravitational Radiation," in Three Hundred Years of Gravitation, ed. S.W. Hawking and W. Israel (Cambridge University Press, 1987), pp. 330-458.
  2. Michele Maggiore, Gravitational Waves: Volume 1: Theory and Experiments (Cambridge University Press)
  3. Misner, Thorne, Wheeler, Gravitation (Princeton University Press) [Chapters 18 (weak gravitational fields), 35 (propagation of GWs), 36 (generation of GWs) and Exercises: 35.1, 35.2, 35.15, 36.2, 36.5, 36.6, 36.8, 36.9]
15:30 to 16:00 - Tea/coffee break
16:00 to 17:30 Adam Pound Course 4 Self-force and radiation reaction in general relativity

Overview of extreme mass ratio inspirals.  Perturbation theory in GR. Orbital dynamics in Schwarzschild and Kerr spacetime. The adiabatic approximation. Foundations of self-force theory: matched asymptotic expansions. Practical methods: puncture scheme and mode-sum regularization. 

References: 

  1. Leor Barack, Adam Pound, Self-force and radiation reaction in general relativity, arXiv:1805.10385 [gr-qc].